Do you find it hard to set boundaries with your clients?

By boundaries I mean those times where you are working with a client and it seems like no matter how much you give, it isn’t enough.

You are on call 24/7, answering texts and calls from clients over the holiday weekend, and…

You are going back to the client over and over, with yet again another re-selection…

You have sent your bill for your time and it hasn’t been paid yet, but the client is still asking for more and you are giving it to them…

And feeling grumpy and resentful…

And thinking that you are probably making $12 per hour on this job because of the continuing client demands.

Don’t despair, there is actually a simple way to get this problem solved.

Your boundaries, which define when your clients have access to you, how many product selections will be provided, when client decisions will be made, and when you will be paid, are all items that should be addressed when writing your Letter of Agreement.

A thoughtfully written Letter of Agreement provides the structure to remind you what you should be doing, and gives you the permission and authority to comfortably say… “I have given you three good selections for your sofa and I have fulfilled my obligations in our Letter of Agreement. I will be happy to keep researching but I will need to be paid for that extra time. Is that all good with you?”

Clearing up the problem of demanding text messages and calls is easily solved by putting your office hours in your Letter of Agreement. All you have to do is train yourself not answer texts or calls until Monday morning when you are officially back in your office.

And the part about getting paid on time?

I like to key my client’s payments to the design meetings that I am scheduling, and include that information in my Letter of Agreement.

A simple paragraph should also be included that states the designer reserves the right to stop deliveries until client payments become current.

This kind of organized and focused Letter of Agreement is the structure of your design job.

You may refer back to it to avoid client conflicts and misunderstandings, as it is all in writing and your client signed it. There is no argument…

You may refer back to it when you want to know what you promised you would do for the client, and how much (or how little) time you have to spend on the job.

You may refer back to it when you want to know when you will be paid.

Would you like to learn how to do all of these things?

Then join me in my new webinar series: Job Profit Secrets

This is a live training where I will show you how to use a Letter of Agreement to Create Happy Clients and Profitable Jobs that You Love.

Sign Up and Get More Information Here

Related Posts

Imagination Power

Imagination Power

Take Your Time

Take Your Time

Allowing Imperfect Action

Allowing Imperfect Action

What Sales Funnel?

What Sales Funnel?